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Become a Thought Partner

Partner with us to produce thought leadership that moves the needle on behavioral healthcare.

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Engage Us as Consultants

Need help building capacity within your organization to drive transformational change in behavioral health? Contact us to learn more about our services available on a sliding fee scale.

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Seeking Support

Select from one of the funding opportunities below to learn more or apply.

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Grantmaking

We fund organizations and projects which disrupt our current behavioral health space and create impact at the individual, organizational, and societal levels.

Policy Meets Practice

We support local grassroots organizations that are working to advance recommendations outlined in the Think Bigger Do Good Policy Series.

Community Fund for Wellness

Our participatory grantmaking alters the traditional process of philanthropic giving by empowering service providers and community-based organizations to define the strategy around a specific issue area or population.

Program Related Investments

We provide funds at below-market interest rates that can be particularly useful to start, grow, or sustain a program, or when results cannot be achieved with grant dollars alone.

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Tia Burroughs Clayton, MSS
Consultant

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Alyson Ferguson, MPH
Chief Operating Officer

Contact Alyson about grantmaking, program related investments, and the paper series.

Samantha Matlin, PhD
Vice President of Learning & Community Impact

Contact Samantha about program planning and evaluation consulting services.

Caitlin O'Brien, MPH
Director of Learning & Community Impact

Contact Caitlin about the Community Fund for Immigrant Wellness, the Annual Innovation Award, and trauma-informed programming.

Joe Pyle, MA
President

Contact Joe about partnership opportunities, thought leadership, and the Foundation’s property.

Tyrone Quarterman, BA, MPH Candidate
Graduate Student

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Vivian Figueredo, MPA
Consultant

Georgia Kioukis, PhD
Consultant

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The Scattergood Foundation


The Scattergood Foundation

Our Positioning Statement

Our Partners

News and Events

Vision

The Scattergood Foundation believes major disruption is needed to build a stronger, more effective, compassionate, and inclusive society where behavioral health is central. We approach our work with humility and strive to share power responsibly while being unrelenting advocates for practices that advance equity for all. At the Foundation, we THINK, DO, and SUPPORT in order to shift the paradigm and practice for behavioral health, and recognize the unique spark and basic dignity in every human.

History

The Scattergood Foundation takes its name from Philadelphia Quaker, Thomas Scattergood (1748-1814). Scattergood struggled with bouts of depression throughout his life and advocated for moral treatment, a model that centered dignity, respect, kindness, and love for individuals with mental illness. This model paved the way for the Philadelphia Quaker community to build the nation’s first privately run psychiatric hospital, the Friends Asylum for the Relief of Persons Deprived of the Use of Their Reason, now known as Friends Hospital.

The impetus for the Asylum began approximately 20 years prior, when Scattergood was traveled to England and visited the York Retreat, amental health facilityrun by Quakers. The Retreat was a revolutionary hospital founded on the principle of moral treatment.

Upon his return, Scattergood urged Quakers in Philadelphia to start an organization like the York Retreat. In 1812, Philadelphia Yearly Meeting started a committee charged with understanding the need for the Asylum. Another committee, not under the purview of the Yearly Meeting, founded the Asylum, including raising the funds for a building and developing its mission. The Hospital opened in 1816 and accepted its first patient in 1817.  Over the course of the next 200 years, the Hospital has functioned as a Quaker-rooted institution, providing person-first treatment.

In 2005, due to rising healthcare costs, a new partnership was developed to manage and operate Friends Hospital and the Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation was formed. Today, the Scattergood Foundation aims to “be Thomas Scattergood” for the twenty-first century by building a stronger, more effective, compassionate, and inclusive society where behavioral health is central. We aim to shift the paradigm and practice for behavioral health, so that our society recognizes the unique spark and basic dignity in every human.

 For more on the history of Friends Hospital and its many contributions to the field of mental health, click here.

For more on Quakers and mental health and its intersection with Friends Hospital, click here.

History

The Scattergood Foundation takes its name from Philadelphia Quaker, Thomas Scattergood (1748-1814). Scattergood struggled with bouts of depression throughout his life and advocated for moral treatment, a model that centered dignity, respect, kindness, and love for individuals with mental illness. This model paved the way for the Philadelphia Quaker community to build the nation’s first privately run psychiatric hospital, the Friends Asylum for the Relief of Persons Deprived of the Use of Their Reason, now known as Friends Hospital.

The impetus for the Asylum began approximately 20 years prior, when Scattergood was traveled to England and visited the York Retreat, amental health facilityrun by Quakers. The Retreat was a revolutionary hospital founded on the principle of moral treatment.

Upon his return, Scattergood urged Quakers in Philadelphia to start an organization like the York Retreat. In 1812, Philadelphia Yearly Meeting started a committee charged with understanding the need for the Asylum. Another committee, not under the purview of the Yearly Meeting, founded the Asylum, including raising the funds for a building and developing its mission. The Hospital opened in 1816 and accepted its first patient in 1817.  Over the course of the next 200 years, the Hospital has functioned as a Quaker-rooted institution, providing person-first treatment.

In 2005, due to rising healthcare costs, a new partnership was developed to manage and operate Friends Hospital and the Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation was formed. Today, the Scattergood Foundation aims to “be Thomas Scattergood” for the twenty-first century by building a stronger, more effective, compassionate, and inclusive society where behavioral health is central. We aim to shift the paradigm and practice for behavioral health, so that our society recognizes the unique spark and basic dignity in every human.

 For more on the history of Friends Hospital and its many contributions to the field of mental health, click here.

For more on Quakers and mental health and its intersection with Friends Hospital, click here.

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We welcome new opportunities for collaboration.

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